Food and Mood

The link between the food you eat and your mood is clear to me.

I have a foolproof recipe for an easy lunch if you’re home or near an oven: baked eggs in tomatoes.

It’s simple: hollow and core out the center of a beefsteak tomato, add a scoop of grated parmesan cheese, slip an egg into the pocket and add more parmesan cheese on top. Bake for 350 degrees for about 25 minutes depending on how hot your oven gets and how runny or firm you like your eggs.

Roasting tomatoes is always preferable to eating them raw all the time because roasting a tomato releases its lycopene, a substance thought to be a cancer-fighting agent.

I always like a caprese salad with fresh mozzarella and tomato slices drizzled with olive oil.

Yet cooking with tomatoes is also good.

Try it. See how you feel after you eat a healthful meal as opposed to processed food.

I’ll end here with two ideas that might work:

Use a larger clear glass to drink 8 oz. of almond milk or organic milk from or to drink water from. Fill it up halfway and you’ll be tricked into thinking you’re drinking a smaller amount.

This could be good when it’s sometimes an effort to squeeze in getting calcium. Almond milk has 30 calories in an 8 oz. serving and 450 mg. of calcium.

Even using a 10 oz. clear mug to drink water from seems to trick you into thinking it’s easier to do this.

I’d like to hear if this sounds like a solution.

So far it works for me.

Rather than take calcium supplements that can cause kidney stones Dr. Oz recommends having 1,000 to 1,200 mg. from food and drink sources.

Two pieces of string cheese plus a glass of almond milk plus the calcium from dark green leafy vegetables could be all a person needs to get a good daily allowance.

Run this by your primary care doctor to see if this makes sense. It makes sense to me.

Anything that can make it easier to be well by eating more healthfully to nourish a person’s body and mind:
I’m all for it.

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Author: Chris Bruni

Christina Bruni is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Left of the Dial. She owns a resume writing and career help business. She contributed a chapter "Recovery is Within Reach" to Benessere Psicologico: Contemporary Thought on Italian American Mental Health. As well as an author and activist, Bruni is an artist and a fitness buff.

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