Trusting Our Intuition

I watched a Suze Orman DVD a couple of years ago.

One guy she singled out had gone to school to get a degree so he could have a better career. He couldn’t find a job and might have incurred student loan debt.

He had been a waiter. Suze Orman berated him. She told him he could’ve had a perfectly fine life if he continued to wait tables.

After she was done trussing him up it looked like the guy was about to cry. His eyes were wet. She had publicly humiliated him.

Frankly, that’s not how I want an “expert” to treat me.

I’m confident we’ve all felt guilty and ashamed when we’ve tried to live by an expert’s rules and failed.

The kicker is: I went back to school when I was unemployed so that I could get a degree that would enable me to have a better career.

Suze Orman is against people doing what I did: going back to school instead of immediately looking for a replacement job.

Yes: I do think we need to trust our intuition more.

We need to pay attention to how our bodies feel and what our bodies are telling us.

Plenty of peers get college degrees. Not everyone uses their degree on the job they have. Yet educating yourself is not ever a waste of time or money if you ask me.

I’ll talk about this in future blog entries: why I think and will always think it’s no crime to want to do what you love and earn a livable wage or salary from it.

Telling a person that he should be content to wait tables when that is not what his soul calls out for him to do is a mistake.

Better: tell him that if he can’t find another job he can wait tables and do something else on the side that brings him more happiness.

Using our intuition to decide what’s the right thing to do makes sense.

Maybe the waiter convinced himself to purse the career-of-the-moment instead of listening to what the still voice inside him told him he was passionate about.

Maybe he could’ve done volunteer work in the new field to put on his resume when he did start to look for a new job.

Maybe he realized in the end that it wasn’t where his heart was after all.

In my blog I’ll talk about what I think is practical to do and what is possible to achieve.

My goal is to be a cheerleader not a naysayer.

You can decide for yourself if what I write makes sense.

I don’t think shaming people or making them feel guilty is pretty.

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Author: Chris Bruni

Christina Bruni is the author of the critically acclaimed memoir Left of the Dial. She owns a resume writing and career help business. She contributed a chapter "Recovery is Within Reach" to Benessere Psicologico: Contemporary Thought on Italian American Mental Health. As well as an author and activist, Bruni is an artist and a fitness buff.

3 thoughts on “Trusting Our Intuition”

  1. Dear Chris:

    What an important blog post this is! Thank you for it.

    I think for some of us, our intuition is lost for several reasons. Sometimes we cannot trust ourselves, and we defer to our doctors, or clinicians.

    Sometimes, as is the case for me, My Voice was lost to me as a little girl. In recovering, I have found it, built it, try to cleave to it.

    Intuition is linked to Dreams, I think.
    It is helpful to find what your own personal dream(s) is/are.

    My dream one day is to open a thrift shop. I would call it
    “The One, Two, Three Shop”, as nothing would be over three dollars. The prices, then would reflect value, and I would tag things by a simple color coding, with no need for laborious pricing. There would be a section for boutique items, past the 1 or 2 or 3 dollar merchandise.

    My profits would go to a mental health organization.

    I was talking with a friend the other day. She and I were “comparing notes”. We said how often we feel like giving up. But somehow we find the strength to go on.

    Chris: I think that finding that strength is part of our intuition……

    Very sincerely,

    Leslie, in Baltimore

    1. Dear Leslie,

      Your thrift shop idea sounds wonderful.
      And you are right about finding the strength to go on.
      I think this is a good idea for a future blog post: finding the strength to go on.

      Cheers,
      Chris

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