How Much Exercise You Need

A shrink told me that the current thinking corroborates that engaging in short periods of exercise throughout the week is definitely okay.

I’m 54–I’ve been lifting weights for over 8 years so far. I find that my older body cannot sustain my former madwoman intense 50 to 60 minute lifting sessions 2x per week anymore.

The health coach I employed vetted what I thought myself months ago: it’s time to exercise in more frequent sessions of shorter duration.

The spring issue of the NIH MedlinePlus magazine gives these exercise guidelines:

Adults and older adults: 2 to 5 hours per week.

Adults with chronic conditions or disabilities: 2 to 5 hours per week as able.

Pregnant women: 2 hours and 30 minutes per week as able.

Kids: 1 hour per day.

Young children: 3 hours per day.

I’m 8 years older than when I first started lifting weights.

I’ve learned firsthand that you need to adapt as you go along. To be flexible to changing when your needs change. To honor your limits in any given session and modify your approach for that day.

The benefits of exercise are numerous. To be blunt: You’ll feel better when you exercise.

My father died of Stage 3 colon cancer that spread to his liver.

He spent 3 hours a day watching FoxNews. Regardless of his choice of state news channel the fact is he was sitting around doing nothing all day when he was older.

Please–I urge you–step away from the TV and break a sweat.

It can be gardening, raking leaves, walking your dog, salsa dancing.

I will report back in 2 weeks the outcome in my life of exercising more frequently in shorter time sessions.

My goal is to give people hope that engaging in any form of moderate sustained physical activity is well worth the effort.

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Getting Support for Your Goals

The one small act of scrambling eggs and veggies for breakfast has whirled into action other goals in a snowball roll.

The health coach services end in two weeks. This 2-month health coach service was well worth the money.

This is why I tell readers to get the support you need to plan and prepare for the new goals you want to take on.

One of my ideas is to go back to school for a writing degree.

It can be scary to make changes even though the changes might be positive.

That’s why I say: create a support team of individuals you can talk with.

Lastly: to remember that with health you have everything you need.

What I write I would like to educate, empower, and entertain readers.

To give followers the idea that it’s not as hard as you think to make changes.

I’ve been scrambling culinary sunshine for 6 weeks so far.

I say Go for It: risk change.

You don’t know until you try what’s possible.

Saying Goodbye to SSI or SSDI

Disclaimer: I understand that a lot of people can’t hold a job and need to collect SSI or SSDI.

Yet even in this scenario the definition of a “job” can be expanded to doing volunteer work or singing in a choir or playing guitar in a band. Doing whatever gives you joy.

On the other hand:

It’s possible to go down the path of finding the job you love, earning a livable salary from it, and renting or owning your own home.

Last week I had an experience that illuminated a hidden truth.

People with disabilities are told we’re “courageous” for battling what goes on.

The truth would be harder for the able-ist folk to understand:

A lot of people with disabilities simply think that what we want to do is possible.

We expect that we can get out of life the things we want. Just like non-disabled people.

Faced with naysayers who tell us these things can’t be done:

We plot and plan how to get what we know it’s our right to have.

I have met a person who I like to think thought: “Why can’t I?”

You and I and everyone facing a challenge shouldn’t be deterred.

One person who wasn’t deterred I have had the honor and privilege of meeting.

This was a person who wanted to get a professional job even though they used a service dog. And they got their dream job. The dog goes with them to meetings.

You and I and everyone should be thinking: “What if?” and “Why not?”

As a fortune cookie stated:

The best angle from which to approach a problem is the TRYangle.

SSDI gives a person a 9-month Trial Work Period (TWP) during which you can still collect government benefits.

SSI benefits are reduced by a dollar for every dollar you earn.

Collecting government benefits and holding a job is sometimes possible too.

My stance is that I’m rooting for those of us who want to get a job they’d love doing.

The reality that a person can use their service dog on a job is the greatest inspiration.

In the coming Money Monday blog entry I’m going to talk about building up a cushion of cash that will enable you to take the leap into finding your dream job.

Having this emergency fund will help you weather any financial disasters that happen when you’re employed.

 

Egged On

Succeeding at one fitness goal empowers you to make other changes.

I’ve been scrambling eggs for breakfast for 4 week in a row so far.

For two days this week wasn’t possible.

Remembering that setbacks are to be expected you can cut yourself a break when you fall down every so often in doing what you’re trying to do.

I egged myself on (pun intended) to embark on setting another goal.

I find that trying to achieving one goal at a time is the method for not giving up.

Having too many goals  you expect to get at the same time will backfire.

My goal is to use the Changeology book to execute the 90-day plan of having eggs for breakfast and salads for lunch.

I’ll end here by telling readers that the Changeology book website is flawed. I’d like to use their contact form to tell them to post a list of FAQs with answers for every reader.

In fact the team at the website will not respond to you individually even though they say they will.

I’ve had a number of questions: is it okay if it takes longer than 90 days to achieve your goal? If it takes longer does this mean your goal won’t stick for the long-term?

What if you want to change an aspect of your original goal so that it’s easier to achieve it?

These questions have not been answered.

In the next Fitness Fridays blog entry I will talk more about getting support–from an actual expert like a health coach, and from friends and family,  and peers and others.

It might cost a bundle to hire a health coach yet doing this can be a great use of any extra money you have.

Your health coach can empower to make these changes.

I found out that the simple act of changing what I ate for breakfast activated my desire to make other changes.

It starts by reaching out for support. And this doesn’t have to cost a dime all the time.

Checking a book out of the library on the topic or talking with a person who’s been down this road before: it’s all good–and it’s free.

Using An EAP – Employee Assistance Program

A lot of readers might not know that when you work at a job you might have support options in place within the company you work for.

This is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) that some businesses offer. There is no cost to talk to an EAP counselor.

For any kind of stress at work or home that is impacting your success on the job the EAP counselor can help you with resources at your disposal.

In 1991 at my first job I talked to an EAP counselor for one session or possibly it was for two sessions.

The point is that challenges on the job can be managed better with the available EAP support you might have.

In the coming blog entries I’m going to talk about different kinds of jobs.

Getting and Accepting Support

My goal is to share the insight I’ve gained with blog readers and followers.

What’s true: success often hinges on collaboration and cooperation.

Before you can be successful at a job or any other endeavor it pays to have a support network in place.

In society for everyone regardless of our challenge type getting support isn’t easy.

For a lot of us accepting support turns out to be hard.

My thinking might be off base. Yet I think too many people are so wrapped up in living for their self-gain that they don’t care about taking time out to help others who could use a hand.

The myth of the rugged individual has persisted in America for too long.

You’re told your weak if you don’t buck up and handle your business on your own.

Only when you could use an assist hardly anyone is willing to come forth to aid you.

This dynamic is a far worse condition than any type of stigma in countering a person’s success in recovery.

My stance is this: I’ve been here on this Earth over 50 years so far.

My first corporate office job career was an attempt to make the big bucks.

After I crashed and burned working at these jobs that were an ill-fit, I went back to school to have the right-fit career.

What I’ve learned in my over 25 years of employment I gladly share.

The things I know to be true—like the fact that recovery is possible for a significant number of people—I’m willing to share in the blog too.

It’s a myth that “the vast majority” of people can’t recover.

Having support, utilizing self-care, working at some kind of job (even if it’s a dedicated hobby or volunteer work), and doing what you love are tools in the tool kit to use to have a successful recovery.

Recovery starts with getting and accepting support.

It’s time to give the hateful outdated rhetoric the boot.

For too long opposing sides have said and done things to inflame each other.

I’ll end here with this: recovery is easier to achieve with support from others like family, your treatment providers, friends, and lovers.

Having a job you love is easier to obtain using the support and resources that are available.

In coming blog entries I’ll talk about support that exists for employees at a company.

TechHire

I’ve decided to devote Mondays to finances since living well without going into debt can be a challenge.

The first Money Monday focuses on an initiative that President Obama created. Remember him? He did a lot of good–and announcing the Opportunity at Work program was one thing.

TechHire was created to help individuals living in the U.S. obtain good jobs without college degrees.

The link to TechHire is at the end of this blog entry.

No more flipping burgers or managing people that flip burgers.

Instead of reawakening the fossil fuel coal industry Mr. Toupee our current president (whose real name I won’t use) should expand and improve the TechHire program.

In coming blog entries I will talk more about personal finances.

Getting a paycheck is one thing. Holding on to our money for an emergency is another thing.

And in the future I would like to give details about how to effectively negotiate getting a worthy pay raise on the job.

See TechHire here. And Opportunity at Work here.