Using An EAP – Employee Assistance Program

A lot of readers might not know that when you work at a job you might have support options in place within the company you work for.

This is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) that some businesses offer. There is no cost to talk to an EAP counselor.

For any kind of stress at work or home that is impacting your success on the job the EAP counselor can help you with resources at your disposal.

In 1991 at my first job I talked to an EAP counselor for one session or possibly it was for two sessions.

The point is that challenges on the job can be managed better with the available EAP support you might have.

In the coming blog entries I’m going to talk about different kinds of jobs.

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Getting and Accepting Support

My goal is to share the insight I’ve gained with blog readers and followers.

What’s true: success often hinges on collaboration and cooperation.

Before you can be successful at a job or any other endeavor it pays to have a support network in place.

In society for everyone regardless of our challenge type getting support isn’t easy.

For a lot of us accepting support turns out to be hard.

My thinking might be off base. Yet I think too many people are so wrapped up in living for their self-gain that they don’t care about taking time out to help others who could use a hand.

The myth of the rugged individual has persisted in America for too long.

You’re told your weak if you don’t buck up and handle your business on your own.

Only when you could use an assist hardly anyone is willing to come forth to aid you.

This dynamic is a far worse condition than any type of stigma in countering a person’s success in recovery.

My stance is this: I’ve been here on this Earth over 50 years so far.

My first corporate office job career was an attempt to make the big bucks.

After I crashed and burned working at these jobs that were an ill-fit, I went back to school to have the right-fit career.

What I’ve learned in my over 25 years of employment I gladly share.

The things I know to be true—like the fact that recovery is possible for a significant number of people—I’m willing to share in the blog too.

It’s a myth that “the vast majority” of people can’t recover.

Having support, utilizing self-care, working at some kind of job (even if it’s a dedicated hobby or volunteer work), and doing what you love are tools in the tool kit to use to have a successful recovery.

Recovery starts with getting and accepting support.

It’s time to give the hateful outdated rhetoric the boot.

For too long opposing sides have said and done things to inflame each other.

I’ll end here with this: recovery is easier to achieve with support from others like family, your treatment providers, friends, and lovers.

Having a job you love is easier to obtain using the support and resources that are available.

In coming blog entries I’ll talk about support that exists for employees at a company.

TechHire

I’ve decided to devote Mondays to finances since living well without going into debt can be a challenge.

The first Money Monday focuses on an initiative that President Obama created. Remember him? He did a lot of good–and announcing the Opportunity at Work program was one thing.

TechHire was created to help individuals living in the U.S. obtain good jobs without college degrees.

The link to TechHire is at the end of this blog entry.

No more flipping burgers or managing people that flip burgers.

Instead of reawakening the fossil fuel coal industry Mr. Toupee our current president (whose real name I won’t use) should expand and improve the TechHire program.

In coming blog entries I will talk more about personal finances.

Getting a paycheck is one thing. Holding on to our money for an emergency is another thing.

And in the future I would like to give details about how to effectively negotiate getting a worthy pay raise on the job.

See TechHire here. And Opportunity at Work here.

 

How to Retire While You’re Still Working

The radical idea has come to me that a person can “retire” while they’re still working.

The revelation has come that you can’t continue to pin your hopes on achieving something at a future date.

Your happiness shouldn’t be linked to succeeding at getting to a goal.

You should be able to be happy right here right now wherever you are in your life.

You don’t have to like the circumstances you’re under. Yet I don’t think letting the pain rob you of optimism is going to help you heal.

On the contrary: doing what gives you joy can help you heal.

As regards to employment: a person can’t postpone doing something until they retire.

I say: Just Do It today and every day you’re alive.

This is important for having a sense of control over the direction of your life.

It’s imperative to feel good while you’re working.

Not to view retirement as a Get Out of Jail Free monopoly card.

It comes down to allowing yourself to experience real joy at whatever point in your life you are living.

Not numbing the effects of a job you hate with food, drugs, or alcohol.

That’s the point of working at 2 jobs you love instead of one soul-crushing job.

In the coming week I’m going to start posting finance themes under the banner of Money Mondays.

You want to travel to Paris? Make It Happen.

Eggs for Breakfast

In the May issue of Elle magazine Dua Lipa was interviewed.

She’s the Albanian singer-songwriter who won a Grammy award for Best New Artist.

Dua is Albanian for love. The music star revealed she eats eggs as snacks all the time. She cooked and fed her interviewer eggs.

My health coach vetted that having 2 eggs ( or 3 if you’re hungrier) for breakfast is okay.

So far I’ve scrambled eggs and veggies for 3 weeks.

That’s 21 days of the 90-day action plan in Changeology: 5 Steps to Realizing Your Goals and Resolutions.

Reading the Dua Lipa interview was so uplifting and inspiring.

The singer-songwriter seems real. Grounded. Like she’s grateful for her good fortune.

Just to know that there’s a famous singer-songwriter having eggs everyday can show us that Snap and Crackle Have Popped and outlived their usefulness.

I say: step away from the cereal box aisle. Your body will thank you.

 

 

Showing Up As Yourself

In my life when I let the illness define me I thought that doing what “normal” people do would be the cure.

The world tells you what’s acceptable. You think you’re supposed to do these things.

Only you cannot repress your soul and expect to be well. Ill health is the result of being cut off from your true self.

The ultimate goal as I see it in recovery is to become who you are.

Show up as this person wherever you go.

Self-doubt and confidence go hand-in-hand. As I wrote in You Are Not Your Diagnosis:

My employment history shows that one of three things is possible:

  • You’re just starting out and haven’t yet figured out the ideal workplace.
  • You loved your job or career when you started it and today it no longer thrills you.
  • You thought that this particular job or career was the one you wanted. It doesn’t work out and you’re forced to change.

Knowing yourself and what you are suited to do and not do is the key to success.

If you have to act false to yourself on a job you’re rolling a wheel up a hill over and over like Sisyphus in the Greek myth.

I say: get a second job to supplant your primary income rather than continuing to show up as an imposter to a job you’re not happy doing.

If you’re not happy doing your job you won’t be motivated to excel so how can you be effective at it?

This is the definition of “spinning your wheels.”

In a coming blog entry I offer a remedy for dissatisfaction.

Rebelling the Role of “Mental Patient”

It can seem like there’s a glass wall separating people with mental health conditions from others.

It’s like you can see what’s on the other side–“success” “a good life” “a career” “a home”–and the wall stands between you and getting these things.

What is this invisible barrier? Internalized self-stigma brought on by harboring outdated false beliefs about what a person’s life is destined to become after a psychiatric emergency.

Getting to this side involves breaking free of the shackles of guilt and shame.

What I’ve learned I’ll gladly share here. I want to quote from the Introduction to my career handbook so that you might be convinced of the truth: You Are Not Your Diagnosis:

As a young person, I was happy even though my life was less than ideal. Yes—I chose to be happy even when the circumstances of my life were dismal. You can like I did rebel the role of “mental patient.” You are not your diagnosis. You’re a human being with wants, needs, desires, goals, and dreams just like everyone living on earth. It’s a mistake to think your diagnosis limits you forever in what you can do.

Having a diagnosis is often part of the package you present to others yet it isn’t your identity. Defining yourself by your symptoms locks you into a no-win mental straitjacket. Your diagnosis is not a dead end and it doesn’t define you.

A women’s organization I’m a member of used to ask its members: Who are you?

I say: you have the right to choose your identity.

In a coming blog entry I’ll talk about this in more detail.